Hitler’s Struggle (part II: World War I)



The assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand
by Serbian nationalist Gavrilo Princip

Nation after nation, the world fell under the spell of this New World Order; an order that in the name of prosperity, justice and equality was successful along the next century in bringing what seemed to be many positive changes to the world; changes like: the belief in the innate goodness of man; secularism; belief in progress; faith in science; nationalism [and internationalism]; liberalism; democracy; and capitalism. [1]

By the beginning of the 20th century, half of the world’s powers had already embraced this New World Order –most by the means of revolution-; while the other half felt threatened by its advances. The German Empire was the greatest opponent to it, and detested what the western world was turning into; which Kaiser Wilhelm II summarised as: “Service to Mammon, greed, self indulgence, land grabbing, lying, treachery, and not least, murder”. In Hitler’s Mein Kampf we can see exactly the position of Germany, why they thought the changes brought by the NWO were not so positive, why they despised the consequences of Adam Smith’s doctrine, and why they cherished the Old World Order; about which Hitler wrote: “Why couldn't I have been born a hundred years earlier? Say at the time of the Wars of Liberation when a man, even without a 'business,' was really worth something?!”, and ”As a young scamp in my wild years, nothing had so grieved me as having been born at a time which obviously erected its Halls of Fame only to shopkeepers and government officials.” [2]

Most of Germany’s rulling elite shared the same thoughts at the beginning of the 20th century, which implies that Hitler did not come up with this conspiracy; he simply continued fighting the battles that others lost before him. Even the attempts to link all this to the Jews and the freemasons was not Hitler’s idea; it dates back before WWI, as we can see in the example of General Erich Friedrich Wilhelm Ludendorff (joint head of Germany’s war effort during WWI), who wrote many books and articles on the same line, way before Hitler, making claims such as: "Masonry brings its members into conscious subjection to the Jews...”, ”it trains them to become venal Jews...", and " German Masonry is a branch of organized international Masonry, the headquarters of which are in New York... There also is the seat of Jewish world Power..."

As a matter of fact, Germany planned an attack on the east coast of the United States 10 years before WWI. Kaiser Wilhelm II thought that capitalism was vulnerable, and believed that an attack on the international systems of trade, credit and insurance could bring the whole New World Order down. In 1903 he ordered the preparation of ‘Operational Plan Three’ to attack the eastern seaboard of the United States with 60 ships and 100.000 men, and to shell Manhattan and capture Boston. [3] Even though the plan was finally dropped in 1907; the hostility towards the NWO continued. But it would not be until 1914 when an unfortunate casual incident would trigger the awaited clash between both sides at a global scale… or, was it not a casual incident?

The Austro-Hungarian Empire was also an apologist for the Old World Order; as well as a close ally to Germany. Its ruler, Franz Joseph I, had spent his 66 years on the throne resisting any kind of change. He hated the idea of political reform, and even told US president Theodor Roosevelt: “You see in me the last European monarch of the old school”. But in contrast, his nephew -and heir to the throne- Archduke Franz Ferdinand, had radical ideas for political reform, and believed that there was no other way for the future but to take the power out the exclusive hands of the ethnic Germans and Austrians and share it with the other ethnic groups. German Kaiser Wilhelm II tried to persuade him of this idea, saying to him during a visit: “the Slavs are born not to rule, but to obey; this must be brought home to them. And if they can imagine that they can look to Belgrade for their salvation, they must be cured of this believe.” But Franz Ferdinand had other plans, and had even drafted a map for the future “United States of Great Austria”.

On the 28th of June 1914, and during an official visit to Sarajevo, Franz Ferdinand suffered an assassination attempt. A Serbian nationalist threw a grenade at his car on the way to the town hall; which bounced back and injured two guards. Franz Ferdinand reached the town hall, but only to shout at the officials waiting there: “So you welcome your guests with bombs”, and returned to the car ordering the driver to take him to the hospital to see the injured. Meanwhile, and due to the failure of the assassination plan, the rest of the six conspirators left for home. One of them, a nineteen year old by the name of Gavrilo Princip, stopped on the way to buy a sandwich on the corner with the “Franz Joseph” Road. At that moment he saw Franz Ferdinand’s car taking a wrong turn just on the same spot where he was standing. While the driver was turning the car back into the main road, Princip took his gun and shot Franz Ferdinand and his wife; who died minutes later on their way to the hospital.

Gavrilo Princip was immediately arrested and went down in history as the anarchist that started WWI by accident. However, Princip, as well as his accomplices, were sponsored by a Serbian secret society known as “The Black Hand”; which provided them with 4 pistols, 6 grenades and suicide pills in case they were captured. This secret society was formed by military officers, and led by the Serbian chief of military intelligence, Dragutin Dimitrijevic; which had already assassinated King Alexander I of Serbia to put a new king in his place under their control. But of course, this doesn’t prove there was a conspiracy to start WWI, nor to take the Archduke out of the way because of his progressive ideas; so I’ll just leave it to you to draw your own conclusion and continue with WWI.

The incident in Sarajevo divided the world into two camps: as it was expected, the apologists for the NWO (mainly France, Great Britain and the United States) against the apologists for the OWO (mainly the German Empire, the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the Ottoman Empire). The only exception to this rule from the great powers was the Russian Empire, which even though –as we saw before- was trying to defend itself from the attacks of the bankers, took sides against Germany due to its pledge to protect Serbia and the Franco-Russian Alliance; by which Russia was benefiting from cheap loans from France to rebuild its deficient military technology. [4]

Germany, which played a leading role in WWI, saw no other option but to extend the conflict to the colonies, and with it weaken the European campaigns of world powers like Britain; forcing it to send much of its army far from Europe. In the colonies we also find the same conflict between the OWO and the NWO, even inside each country; as in the example of South Africa. The Boer Revolt began in South Africa with WWI for this same reason; which, as Manie Maritz -the leading rebel of the Boer Revolt- put it: “we don’t want to be ruled by the Jews and the financers of England”.

We all know who lost WWI at the end; so I’m not going to get into details. However, according to some Germans, its defeat was not due to the military superiority of the enemy in the battlefield, but due to a treacherous conspiracy inside German borders…

“At the very moment when the German divisions were receiving their last instructions for the great attack, the general strike broke out in Germany in all of its armaments factories thus depriving the German army of crucial arms and ammunitions. It strengthened the enemy belief in victory and relieved the paralyzing despair of the Allied front-in the time that followed, thousands of German soldiers had to pay for this with their blood. The instigators of this vilest of all scoundrel tricks were the aspirants to the highest state positions of revolutionary Germany." [2]


… Next Chapter: Hitler’s Struggle (part III: the unfinished war)


Bibliography:
Hew Strachan, “The First World War, Volume I: To Arms” , Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2001; cited in: “The First World War”, Hamilton Film Partnership, 2003


References:
[1] Carroll Quigley, “Tragedy and Hope”, the Macmillan Company, New York, 1966
[2] Adolf Hitler, “Mein Kampf", Eher Verlag, Munich, 1925
[3] Wikipedia: Operational Plan Three (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operational_Plan_Three)
[4] Wikipedia: Franco-Russian Alliance (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franco-Russian_Alliance)

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